Ritual of the Moon

Kara Stone

Ritual of the Moon MastheadRitual of the Moon Masthead

Ritual of the Moon

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Game Information

Available on:PCApr 18, 2019

Developer: Kara Stone

Genre: Interactive Story

Ritual of the Moon is a 28 day long multi-narrative game exploring loneliness, power, and healing. Once discovering her powers, The Earth’s Council exiles the witch to the moon to live out the rest of her life looking at the earth - and the woman she loves - that she can never go back to. The player spends 5 minutes each day over the 28 days reflecting on her experiences on Earth, meditating at her altar, and making a life or death choice. The game is a daily meditational activity composed of a memory game, drawing symbols, receiving a mantra, and making a decision about the future of the earth. The game tracks the decisions the player makes, becoming a sort of mood tracker. Depending on their feelings over the lunar cycle, the player will experience one of the six unique endings. Ritual of the Moon is fully created from handcrafted and found objects scanned then digitally manipulated. Each of the witch’s reflections were hand-embroidered. The mantras were wood burned. The artists used paint, clay, fabric, paper, dried plants, wool, foam, wire, plastic, pieces of computer hardware, crystals, and a variety other media. The process was long, meditative, and iterative.
Ritual of the Moon Release Trailer thumbnail

Ritual of the Moon Release Trailer

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Reviews

Ritual of the Moon is a reflection of life, tranquility, and choice that is more of an experience than a game. The paper aesthetic and color palette fit the tone perfectly. There's not much in terms of content, but the short bursts are nice each day.

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Ritual of the Moon's takes five minutes from twenty-eight consecutive days to consider, measure, and test the variable nature of morality. It's a cycle of play that finds a rhythm with the player's social and behavioral conflict, and questions that seemed trapped in ethereal ambience reveal honest and unexpected conclusions. My own introspection and negligence, as it turns out, have a lot in common.

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