Sayonara UmiharaKawase+ MastheadSayonara UmiharaKawase+ Masthead

Sayonara UmiharaKawase+

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Game Information

Available on:PCOct 6, 2015

Developer: Studio Saizensen

Publisher: Agatsuma Entertainment

Genres: Action, Platformer

Easy to play, difficult to master, ‘Sayonara UmiharaKawase’ is a totally unique ‘Rubbering Action’ physics based puzzle platform game with over 20 years of gaming history. Developed by the creators of the original game (Kiyoshi Sakai and Toshinobu Kondo) and available for the first time on Steam, this cult classic was a Japanese indie smash hit before the rest of the world knew what a cult classic was!

Play as `Umihara Kawase` - a 20 year old backpacking Japanese sushi chef armed with a fishing rod, a rubber fishing line and a fishing hook. Avoid fish-like enemies, conveyer belts, spikes, watery pits, time travel and more. Make your way to the end of each level, collecting items and finding along the way. The deeper in to this dream-like game players venture, the more challenging the solutions and the greater the time pressure becomes. Along the way, look out for shortcuts and secret exits and unlock bonus levels.
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Reviews

DarkZero

6 / 10
DarkZero

If Steam is the only resource to experience this game, it's still worth checking out, but those who own a PS Vita or PS TV should consider that the definitive platform instead.

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Cubed3

3 / 10
Brandon Howard

Frankly, nothing about Sayonara Umihara Kawase makes it a welcoming experience. The controls might be tight, but a platformer where the physics are a constant battle, and the levels restart so slowly, make for an extremely aggravating adventure. While the mechanics might make it work better at a puzzle platformer, this still demands cat-like reflexes so often that this simply isn't an option. As far as challenging platformers go, this definitely sets the bar high, but even the most devoted fan of the genre will have trouble looking past the glaring issues present here.

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