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Rudy Lavaux

RudyC3

Favorite Games:
  • Super Metroid
  • Resident Evil 2
  • Banjo Kazooie

104 games reviewed
76.4 average score
80 median score
71.2% of games recommended

Rudy Lavaux's Reviews

A dedicated Nintendo fan since the Game Boy and Super Nintendo, Rudy is your typical, balding ol' wise man, forever stuck in the past, living under a hut made of game cartridges.
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8 / 10 - NES Remix
Feb 10, 2014

NES Remix takes most of the NES' early library of first party games, and fractions them into small tasks that help to revisit the most satisfying moments of each, as well as "remixes" some into new types of gameplay involving all sorts of cool and surprising elements. Whether one has already tried these games, or even still owns them to this day, he or she may well find that this new way of revisiting them might just be more fun than the games themselves. Playing NES Remix allows players to discover alternative methods to enjoy these classics in ways that they would not have otherwise found themselves by playing their original cartridges or Virtual Console releases. On the other hand, those who never tasted some of these titles, some of which are perhaps not anymore amongst the most well-known of Nintendo's back catalogue of NES classics, may well find that they want to experience them for themselves in the way they were meant to be played, after they try NES Remix. Indeed, NES Remix sheds new light on those classics to make them more relevant even to this day. Although, with that being said, there will always be players who will simply have a hard time getting into older software on the premise that they look, sound, and play "old", and, other than in the visual department to a small extent, NES Remix does very little to change this.

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Other than the slightly improved visuals and frame-rate that the PC allows, this version doesn't bring enough novelty when compared to the previous console HD versions.

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Another World: 20th Anniversary Edition takes a beloved classic of the past that hasn't necessarily aged very well and brings to players who are hungry for monuments of gaming history just the version they needed to finally take a dive if they hadn't already. Those who played it back when first released may find here a good reason to dive in again on their Wii U and reminisce youth, albeit at a kind of a steep price. Waiting on a discount may be a good idea for those who have their hesitations as the game is indeed fairly short and ultimately doesn't bring much more than HD enhanced graphics, an easier difficulty on the whole, and a lacklustre revamped collection of sound effects. Nevertheless, the simplistic design, HD rendition, great CD soundtrack of the Mega CD version, and the overall intriguing experience of trial-and-error still stand out well enough to make this a worthwhile purchase for those looking for a unique experience on the eShop at the moment.

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Guacamelee! Super Turbo Championship Edition is a well put together piece of software with a great attention to little details, set in a universe of folklore and culture which is exotic enough in the video game industry to feel highly original, and with a huge deal of humour thrown into the mix for good measure. The tough to master yet easy to understand gameplay, coupled with the many challenges to overcome to fully complete everything do extend the play life into "decent" territory, as it is otherwise a rather short experience for those who will rush through it. Guacamelee! clearly takes a leaf out of a lot of different books in gaming, Metroid being the most obvious, but Castlevania, Megaman, and Zelda are also other clear sources of inspiration, yet it manages to blend it all into what is now its own thing. It sure bases a lot of its appeal on nostalgia for those other franchises and the crowd of references to them thrown all over the place, but this never overshadows its own intrinsic qualities, which are clever design, good production values, great writing and, most of all, a clear love for video games from its creators, which does transpire through their work. Guacamelee! STCE for the Wii U eShop is certainly not a perfect game - it has its couple of minor faults - but never are they detrimental to the overall experience, and this is still a must-have for any fan of the genre.

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Star Wars Pinball: the Heroes Within is the best pack of DLC tables released so far. It features possibly the best tables yet in the Star Wars Pinball series, including some of the most stunningly looking ones too, but also offering more content for the same price than the previously released Balance of the Force pack. Granted there are not many packs to compare this one to, but it's clearly the kind of DLC that makes you wish these tables had been the main game right from the start, and that the base pack had been made DLC instead. Indeed, one must still purchase the base three tables on Wii U in order to experience these four new ones, bringing the overall price to experience these on Nintendo's console to higher than it would be on some other devices where it is possible to purchase tables one by one. That's not to say that the base Star Wars Pinball pack isn't worth purchasing anyway, as its original review will show. That one really impressed with its quality content and exploitation of the franchise for pinball purposes, back in 2013. This new pack builds on what was already a great piece of software for both Star Wars and pinball fans. This new pack is a must-have on the eShop as each table offers lots of fun, looks great, and sounds awesome.

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5 / 10 - FullBlast
Jan 14, 2016

FullBlast is hard to fault entirely in one particular of its many aspects. It doesn't do much wrong: it controls well, the music is nice enough, the visuals, while not impressive, do look clean. It gets the action going, yet it fails to capture the attention because it's too repetitive and not engaging enough. It's neither good nor bad, it just feels dull. Nothing outstanding distinguishes one level from the next, and the lack of anything truly surprising or groundbreaking means that it feels more like work than entertainment to get through all the levels and see the ending. Online leaderboards, while they are a good addition (and are seriously lacking in the brilliant re-releases of old classics on Nintendo platforms), won't be its saving grace. The boring repetitiveness of the action, music, and scenery is likely to put off the most purist of fans, who will likely prefer to whip out an old classic rather than sticking around for too long in this newer title. Lack of content, replayability, and engaging factors hold back what could have otherwise been a much better home console experience, and proves that copy-pasting a mobile game onto a home console is not a good idea.

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Not everyone can be Smash Bros. Other bigger studios have tried that with a bigger budget, bigger roster, bigger… everything, and have still failed to entirely recapture the magic that is to be found in it. However, what must be understood is that not all games need to be Smash Bros. in order to be good! What Kung Fu Panda: Showdown of Legendary Legends tries to do exactly like it, it doesn't do it quite as well. What it tries to do differently from it, however, does feel remarkably good, which does seem to indicate that the great ideas the team does get on its own, are those that translate best in a playable form at the end of the day. This title can be enjoyed by very young fans of the movie because it's not a bad one, and it does offer some things that Nintendo's popular franchise doesn't - maybe not enough of them that would make anyone choose this one over the latter one, but even though it's lacking in more than one department, it can still provide some fun, under the right conditions.

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May 11, 2016

Infinity Runner sadly joins the ranks of the heaps of titles out there which had an immense potential with a great concept and great atmosphere. It starts off well but is marred by technical problems. In addition to this, the repetitiveness of the gameplay and environmental elements take away from the overall feeling of excitement over time, which the title would have provided otherwise.

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It is hard to make an RPG as classic as Dragon Quest VII. The series is known for not trying vastly different things in its mainline entries, rather sticking to a strict established formula that never disappoints its most hardcore fans, especially in Japan where it remains the absolute favourite role-playing experience for most. It is long and it moves slowly with its story, with lots of things to see and do on the side, and levelling up being very slow; however, it never gets boring and manages to hook players with a loveable story and characters served masterfully through witty dialogue, good visuals (if not technically very impressive), and a fantastic soundtrack by maestro Sugiyama-san. It feels very classic in its execution, yes, but the relative non-linearity and all things loveable about the game mentioned previously do contribute to making the long adventure a pleasant trip that never grows tedious. Fragments of the Forgotten Past is a great RPG through and through, masterfully remade for the 3DS, that offers what is perhaps the best value for money on the system in terms of RPG adventuring.

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Dec 8, 2016

The most advanced, most detailed and deepest Pokémon experience to date can now be found in Pokémon Sun and Moon. Perhaps the last big mainstream first party Nintendo franchise to grace the Nintendo 3DS as the next generation is almost upon us, it is an indispensable addition to anyone's game library, even those just remotely interested in Pokémon.

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