Hunter Wolfe


14 games reviewed
77.1 average score
78 median score
50.0% of games recommended
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Jan 22, 2018

You can experience just about everything Ripped Pants at Work has to offer within an hour, which is good because, exploration aside, there isn't anything in the game that will make you want to stick around anyways.

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Oct 26, 2017

Assassin's Creed: Origins is as much a departure as it is a homecoming. Revamped combat mechanics defibrillate the series with much-needed challenge. The guided open-world design encourages and rewards exploration unlike any Assassin's Creed game before it, and takes place in one of the series' most memorable settings. But at the end of the day, and despite some growing pains, Origins is a culmination of the best aspects of the series. And for that, some hiccups in the transition to full-fledged RPG are a fair trade.

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75 / 100 - A Hat in Time
Oct 25, 2017

Most of A Hat in Time feels like a modge podge of creative ideas only amateurly stitched together. The game teeters between delightful charm (like the time I encountered a Mafiosa who wanted to play patty-cake then deceptively punched me across Mafia Town) and blatant lack of polish (like a cutscene where certain characters' limbs seemed paralyzed in a T position.) If a lighthearted, collect-a-thon platformer is your jam, A Hat in Time will constantly please you with its fun platforming and nuanced, cartoony world, but don't go in expecting the finish and cohesion of the classic platformers it takes its inspiration from.

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Aug 22, 2017

Hellblade could have been carried alone by its insanely beautiful graphics and standout voice performances — some of the best of 2017 — but while these scenarios were always refreshing interruptions from long, meditative walks through Helheim, they distracted from the game's greater focus on demystifying a taboo mental disorder.

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85 / 100 - LawBreakers
Aug 17, 2017

LawBreakers feels like combat occurring inside a snowglobe while a five-year-old shakes it really, really quickly. It's a shooter, like so many others out there, but it doesn't camouflage an axis-locked multiplayer formula with a new historical setting or gimmicky abilities — its low-gravity environments and lightning-fast traversal make it like no shooter you've ever played.

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75 / 100 - Tacoma
Aug 5, 2017

If you've played games like Gone Home, Dear Esther or Firewatch, Tacoma is instantly recognizable, but it remains distinct by introducing a wildly exotic space setting and a mechanic that keeps the "look and listen gameplay" from ever becoming a bore.

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60 / 100 - Perception
Jul 19, 2017

Perception's unique echolocation gameplay hook is enough to sustain the game for its 4-5-hour run, but I was saddened that The Deep End Games didn't explore this mechanic any more than it did. Had it, Perception's shallow plot and characters might have found some redemption. Ultimately, Perception is more carnival than amusement park – cheap thrills than top shelf. If you like horror games, you'll like Perception, but you've probably already experienced a bunch of horror titles scarier than this one.

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70 / 100 - Get Even
Jul 7, 2017

Get Even is a respectable first-person shooter, sure. But despite finishing the game eager to start a second playthrough to experience the story with new perspective, the lack of player choice was a considerable disappointment. I felt duped for hunting down every piece of evidence during my time with Cole Black, because it didn't influence the truth that ultimately emerged. This omission reduces Get Even from an imaginative game to a passable one that made me feel I was watching a thriller film more than playing a game.

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May 2, 2017

Don't question it — just buy it. Buy it right now. It isn't a shooter, and there are no puzzles and some will question if this even qualifies as a “game,” but What Remains of Edith Finch is an exemplar in video game narrative design. No other game I've ever played has provoked the same meditation on death, and ultimately life and the beauty of it all.

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Apr 26, 2017

Free-to-play games often carry the stigma of being “pay-to-win” — a design philosophy that says if you want to win, buy in. Orcs Must Die! Unchained isn't that. It's a hoopla of co-op action that works whether or not you want to drop some dough. While the new Sabotage mode is a welcome, albeit lesser refined addition to the series, it's in Battlegrounds that Robot Entertainment flexes its action gameplay muscles and it's the game type that will keep me coming back for dozens more hours — or at the very least, to nab those daily login bonuses.

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