Celeste

Matt Makes Games Inc.

Mighty Man
OpenCritic Rating
91
Top Critic Average
100%
Critics Recommend
Based on 64 critic reviews
Celeste MastheadCeleste Masthead

Celeste

Rating Summary

Based on 64 critic reviews
Mighty Man

OpenCritic Rating

91

Top Critic Average

100%

Critics Recommend

Based on 64 critic reviews
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Game Information

Available on:PlayStation 4Jan 25, 2018
Xbox OneJan 25, 2018
PCJan 25, 2018
Nintendo SwitchJan 25, 2018

Publisher: Matt Makes Games Inc.

Genre: Platformer

Celeste is a platformer about climbing a mountain, from the creators of TowerFall. Unravel the secrets of the mountain and overcome your limitations to reach the summit in over 300 levels!

If she has the stamina, Madeline can climb any surface on Celeste Mountain. There she’ll journey across many dangerous environments using her mid-air dash to explore strange places and meet peculiar characters.

Don’t get spooked – playing in Assist Mode lets you tweak the difficulty – from a slower pace to full on invincibility – whatever sounds fun! Or if you really want to white-knuckle it, take on the challenging B-Side chapters.

Where to Buy

Amazon
GameStop

Review Data

View More
Mighty Head
42
Strong Head
7
Fair Head
0
Weak Head
0
Celeste – Nintendo Switch Trailer thumbnail

Celeste – Nintendo Switch Trailer

Celeste Screenshot 1
Celeste Screenshot 2

IGN

10 / 10.0
Tom Marks

Celeste is a surprise masterpiece. Its 2D platforming is some of the best and toughest since Super Meat Boy, with levels that are as challenging to figure out as they are satisfying to complete.

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PC Gamer

80 / 100
PC Gamer

An engaging, vibrant and challenging platformer that adds narrative to a genre often shy of it.

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Eurogamer

Recommended
Eurogamer

A platformer aimed at speedrunners is also an adventure for the rest of us to savour.

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Metro GameCentral

GameCentral
9 / 10
Metro GameCentral

The best indie platformer since Super Meat Boy, but also one of the best storytelling experiences of recent years – with an incisive and thoughtful portrayal of mental illness.

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