Lost Sphear

Rating Summary

Based on 79 critic reviews
Fair Man

OpenCritic Rating

70

Top Critic Average

37%

Critics Recommend

Based on 79 critic reviews
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6.5 / 10.0
Feb 5, 2018

While the flaws in the game may seem as if I do not recommend the game, there is something intangible about it that keeps you coming back

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Feb 27, 2018

While it, without a doubt, improves on almost every aspect of its predecessor, it also manages to do a “two steps forward; one step back” shuffle. That particular jig is what makes it difficult to suggest, especially for the asking price ($50USD as of this review). Despite the hefty story and gear progression issues, I think this game would definitely be worth a purchase on a sale. It may even be worth the dive for some at full price, but you should be aware of its shortcomings before making that decision. Ultimately, it is hard to recommend Lost Sphear when there are games like Xenoblade Chronicles 2 near the same price point that arguably offer a much more riveting experience.

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4 / 5.0
Mar 9, 2018

Backed up by modern technology, Lost Sphear offers a thoroughly engaging take on the classic RPG formula.

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8.5 / 10.0
Jan 30, 2018

So here I am, gushing over a nostalgia filled love letter to classic JRPG’s when all you really wanted to know was: Is it any good? Well that depends on you as a person really, Lost Sphear is one of those game’s I have found really difficult to score. For old school fans of the genre I would say that Lost Sphear is an absolute must play however as a game on it’s own merits it relies a little too heavily on nostalgia to really come out on it’s own.

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7.8 / 10.0
Jan 30, 2018

Heavily influenced by a lost era of JRPGs, Lost Sphear however has its own charm and personality, fixing many of Tokyo RPG Factory's first faults. It's a good little JRPG that will charm those that miss the traditional gameplay mechanics.

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8.5 / 10.0
Jan 29, 2018

Playing Lost Sphear was like re-visiting the classic RPGs of yesteryear that hooked me in with their enjoyable combat mechanics, impressive world design, and incredibly evil (though somewhat predictable) villains. I thoroughly enjoyed it, and whilst I’ll certainly admit that it had a few flaws, I was completely absorbed by it throughout the entirety of my twenty hour-plus adventure. Believe me, if you’re an RPG fan you need to buy it. It acts as the perfect reminder that RPGs don’t need to have super fancy visuals, overly intricate combat mechanics, or a convoluted plotline to grip players in – they’ve just got to have heart, and that’s something Lost Sphear has in abundance. Here’s to the next fascinating adventure that Tokyo RPG Factory send us on…

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57%
Feb 2, 2018

Lost Sphear tries to recapture the 90s JRPG magic but in the process loses its own identity. Tokyo RPG Factory tried to squash every JRPG trope into this game, and as a result, the characters and the plot suffered. A massive step backwards for Tokyo RPG Factory.

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6 / 10.0
Feb 4, 2018

An average RPG missing a sense of exploration and flexibility to make it memorable. The battle system is a particular highlight, however, and there's definitely some good groundwork if there's to be another game in the series.

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5.5 / 10.0
Feb 4, 2018

Lost Sphear wants to harken back to the great classic JRPGs of yesteryear such as Chrono Trigger and early Final Fantasy games. However, it falters way too much in its execution by providing characters that severely suffer from being tropes and provide eye-rolling dialogue. While the combat is quite enjoyable and the story picks up steam at around the midway point, it is way too slow on the uptake and delivers an experience that can just be classified as serviceable.

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Unscored
Feb 8, 2018

It starts to feel similarly passive-aggressive in the way it does things, too, including a fake ending that plays out countless hours of busywork prior to the real ending. That means we’re dealing with pacing issues in a game that, like its predecessor, still agonizes fruitlessly over how it can best pay homage to Chrono Trigger’s legacy while blatantly ignoring the things that were actually good about that game.

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