That Dragon, Cancer Reviews

That Dragon, Cancer is ranked in the 83rd percentile of games scored on OpenCritic.
5 / 5.0
Jan 14, 2016

With the emotionally draining effect that That Dragon, Cancer will have on you in mind, I'd still implore you to play it. If only to further understand the harm that cancer brings, not only to those diagnosed with the disease, but to their family and loved ones too.

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Jan 18, 2016

While it's far from the typical video game adventure, That Dragon, Cancer is a reminder that games can be so much more than just wish-fulfillment power fantasies. It's an important and unforgettable experience, full of pain, love and grace.

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Jan 11, 2016

That Dragon, Cancer is a family's beautiful tribute to faith, loss, and love

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Jan 11, 2016

The minimalistic approach and slow pace That Dragon, Cancer takes won't appeal to everyone, but it does contain some fiercely moving moments and a very unique overall experience.

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9.5 / 10.0
Jan 14, 2016

That Dragon, Cancer is a difficult thing to approach. It is barely meant to be fun. It is dark and occasionally deeply disturbing, but that's because it has to be. It is also full of hope and love.

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Alana Hagues
Top Critic
85%
Feb 19, 2016

An extremely personal game which confronts cancer head on, it shines brightest when telling its story and examining the effects of grief.

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6.5 / 10.0
Feb 2, 2016

A beautiful game but not quite successful for me as a social experiment.

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8 / 10
Mar 8, 2016

A genuinely affecting love letter

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8 / 10.0
Jan 13, 2016

Although perceptibly divisive in execution and theme, it becomes difficult to imagine an individual that would experience That Dragon, Cancer and not feel richer and better off for having been immersed in its bittersweet storytelling as the end credits roll. While some might be understandably put off by the slim pickings of traditional genre fare on offer here, That Dragon, Cancer staunchly remains as an experience that everybody should let into their lives regardless.

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8.3 / 10.0
Jan 11, 2016

That Dragon, Cancer is an emotional powerhouse that doesn't hold anything back; it's a hard game to get through with dry eyes. Narratively it will please those who are looking for a game that allows the player to explore a game world, linear as it is, that merges together perfectly with the game design.

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Unscored
Jan 22, 2016

You might not relate to everything the Greens have to say, but you won't forget it.

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Unscored
Jan 11, 2016

Make no mistake: The game is a bruising experience. It fully commits to sharing a hard, unsentimental exploration of what it means to watch your child suffer, and ultimately succumb to illness. That Dragon, Cancer is smart about presenting that tragedy through a series of stylistically disparate interactions to prevent itself from becoming dull or numbing.

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10 / 10.0
Jan 23, 2016

It's a slow paced game that can be difficult to watch at times but if you want a strong story and all the feels, then this is the one to turn to. It pushes the boundaries of games as art and it's genuinely the most emotional game I've ever played and I can't recommend it enough. Keep Kleenex nearby.

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71 / 100
Jan 12, 2016

The emotional core of That Dragon, Cancer is real—so real, in fact, and so personal, that I ended up feeling like an outsider looking in. I pitied the Greens for having to endure this awful series of events, but I did not come away feeling connected to their experience, or enlightened by it. This was not because the game tried but failed to connect with me, but because it didn't.

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7 / 10
Feb 12, 2016

Story of a kid who passed away because of cancer, it is impossible not to cry while playing this game. It's a bitter experience for those who don't know anything about this dragon (cancer). Hats off to those patient and brave families who are victims of this dragon.

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75 / 100
Jan 22, 2016

That Dragon, Cancer does not excel in its gameplay, but the story of Joel Green is one that players will remember for a while. This is as genuine as storytelling gets in video games.

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83 / 100
Jul 17, 2017

Seldom does a game come around so powerful that it leaves a long-lasting impact on the player. An experience so dramatic, that is forces those who played it to reflect on their own lives in the real world, outside of the game. That Dragon, Cancer is that game. That Dragon, Cancer is a two hour-ish click adventure game that you can play on PC via Steam or iOS device around $10. That Dragon, Cancer focuses more on narrative than it does gameplay, a trend that has led many titles being dubbed as walking simulators (some positively, others not so much). That Dragon, Cancer however is one walking simulator you should play. It’s true, there is not much more to do in That Dragon, Cancer besides walking around and interacting (point & click) with objects. In the short time you’ll play the game you will encounter a curveball here and there that spices up the fun. Whether it is a kart race around a room, some interesting puzzles to crack or a side-scrolling retro platformer, there are parts in the game that add enough interaction to warrant That Dragon, Cancer classified as a video game and not just a visual novel.

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9.7 / 10.0
Jan 19, 2016

he Green family's interactive memoir dedicated to their son's battle cancer is not just a video game—it is a work of art. The way that Numinous Games has chosen to tell the story is absolutely superb. That Dragon, Cancer is something everyone should experience for themselves.

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Unscored
Jan 18, 2016

That Dragon, Cancer obviously won't be to everyone's tastes, but it's a powerful and touching game that tugs on the heart strings.

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A or higher
Jan 17, 2016

For every high concept, there's this underlying truth that grounds That Dragon, Cancer: the battle the Greens are facing is not the mere act of mourning, but how to mourn. Amy turns to God, while Ryan struggles with God. They get in fights, then reunite, then fight again. At the same time, you're coming in and out of the picture as the curious and helpless observer as they plead to God, each other, and Joel. When it came time for the credits to roll, I couldn't help but appreciate the game and the story the Greens want to tell the world.

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