Submerged

Rating Summary

Based on 52 critic reviews
Weak Man

OpenCritic Rating

54

Top Critic Average

15%

Critics Recommend

Based on 52 critic reviews
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80 / 100
Jul 4, 2019

The Uppercut Games game seeks to connect with the player in this adventure through the presentation of an attractive and mysterious world that unleashes captivating art. The pampering of details to create an environment of great beauty, such as lighting, weather, the night sky, or the day-night cycle helps to want to lose ourselves in the waters of this city, while we delight in a melancholic and evocative soundtrack. An experience that is far from perfect, but if it appeals to you in the least, you should try and feel.

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Unscored
Aug 6, 2016

The game Submerged could have, and by all accounts wanted to be is still hidden here somewhere, but that hardly matters when it so fervently refuses to let you see it.

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Unscored
Sep 11, 2015

About as exciting as watching the tide come in.

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Bit Cultures
Joe Baker
48%
Sep 3, 2015

A slow-moving pace and undemanding platforming might be a draw to the more brain-addled gamer, perhaps enduring a slow-moving Sunday afternoon or a comedown from a particularly Red Bull-heavy Friday night. Nevertheless, there's still an aching sense of potential behind Miku's adventure that will leave you thinking what could've been. As it is, Submerged is pretty forgettable, and sinks rather than swims in the wake of other superior indie journeys. Journey in particular.

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4 / 10.0
Sep 1, 2015

Submerged is...Well, it exists. It wants to stand beside games like Journey, yet missed the mark so much on why Journey worked. It puts you in a world and expects you to be amazed, but never delivers any reason to become attached or really, a world pretty enough to just become absorbed into visually. Float on.

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55 / 100
Aug 31, 2015

Submerged's beautiful setting and sunken post-apocalyptic world were not enough to offset the absence of combat and challenge.

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2 / 10
Aug 31, 2015

Submerged turned out pretty horrible, and while its concept sounded okay on paper, sadly, the execution is an unbelievable disaster. Ugly, extremely rough, buggy and boring; Submerged should be cast off and is not worth the asking price at all. Anyone who might be interested in a, atmospheric exploration game should just play the HD collection of Ico and Shadow of the Colossus, or get Journey.

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2 / 10.0
Aug 27, 2015

Submerged can only be described as a huge disappointment that squandered its potential thanks to some terrible design decisions and being let out the door far too early. Its story is laughable at best, we couldn't muster up any care for the main character Miku and gameplay itself becomes a drag very quickly. The controls are dreadful and the core mechanic within gameplay, the climbing, is clunky and unresponsive. While the soundtrack is fantastic, it isn't enough to make us ignore the glaring problems the game has in terms of performance.

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6 / 10.0
Aug 26, 2015

Submerged tries to go for the same vibe as Journey but falls short. The game world is interesting, but the brief stay in it is tiresome since you're only given one environment. The climbing mechanics are so easy that the courses don't provide any challenge, so the only tough part is in finding the supply drop locations. It doesn't help that the main story isn't very intriguing, and neither is the story of the city, especially since you figure it out faster via the cut scenes than from the illustrations you pick up. There's no need to rush and check out Submerged right away.

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48 / 100
Aug 26, 2015

Submerged is skeletal and unoiled. It is damned by competence: a short story that checks the boxes, but in doing so leaves no mark. I fell asleep twice while playing it, shaken awake by Miku's worsening cough, just looking to fix up Taku and motorboat out as fast as possible. It's a game that has no ambition and says nothing, and through that, quietly stumbles, erodes, and disappears, leaving no impression, no haunting memories.

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